15 02 19

A case study is a research design or method of analysis that seeks to investigate an individual, group, or phenomenon. It lays out key themes and results to understand past and future trends, and aims to explain a problem with more clarity.

Often, a case study examines in detail a single subject to arrive at a clear understanding of the matter. It can include a comparative investigation to show relationships between two or more subjects.

Before you begin to write your case study, read this guide to help you prepare and understand how to do it properly and effectively.

Step 1: Determine the topic of your study.

Identify what you would like to investigate. What issues have you discussed in class? Is there something currently trending on social media or in the news that is of interest to you? Once you decide upon a subject, do further research and interviews to narrow down your focus. Look for information in books, magazines, newspapers, and online journals. Remember to take as many notes as you can as you go along and keep a list of all your resource materials. (You will need this list when citing your references at the end of your study.)

Determine whether anyone has done the same study in the past; this will allow you to refine your work or find a different angle. Reviewing similar studies will provide style and investigative ideas that you might like to try on your own.

The type of case study will depend on your goal.

Step 2: Choose your study type.

There are four types of case studies, depending on your goal and purpose. These include:

  • Illustrative – An illustrative (or descriptive) study uses one or two instances of an event or phenomenon to give readers a clearer overall picture. It aims to give readers a common language and understanding about the given topic.
  • Exploratory – Exploratory (or pilot) case studies aim to find patterns in the data gathered and create a model for easier visualization of that data. They rely on a pre-existing collection of information from which to make an interpretation. The main goal of an exploratory study is to identify questions and select methods of measurement prior to the main investigation.
  • Cumulative – A cumulative study combines information from several sources gathered at different times for greater generalization. This reduces costs and time spent on repetitive studies.
  • Critical instance – The purpose of this study is to examine one or more situations to scrutinize a generalized or universal assumption. Critical instance case studies are typically used in cause and effect situations.

Structure your study for clarity.

Step 3: Have a clear structure and style.

A case study seeks to discover new understandings about a particular issue. It can also contribute to an existing body of knowledge. Therefore, your work should have a clear and organized structure and writing style.

Here are some key elements to take note of as you begin writing your study:

Your introduction should provide a preliminary glimpse into your study.

Introduction – The introduction captures the scope and purpose of your idea; it addresses why and how the case will address the chosen topic. When writing your introduction, try to answer these four questions:

  • What am I studying? Describe the subject of analysis. Briefly explain what elements of the case will help broaden knowledge about it.
  • Why is it important to investigate this topic? Explain the significance of your research issue. Describe why you believe your study design and subject of analysis are essential in understanding the chosen topic.
  • What was presently known before this study was conducted? Give your readers the background information they need to understand why you are writing this study. Describe how your case will prove useful in exploring new knowledge about the topic at hand.
  • How will this study advance further knowledge? Describe why your case study will provide new ways of understanding your topic and how it will expand currently documented knowledge.

These questions should be answered in a few paragraphs. (If you are addressing a complex problem, more elaborate background information is required.)

A well-curated literature review is the backbone of a study.

Literature Review – A literature review includes a historical interpretation of your subject. Background information included here should be well-organized to help your readers better understand the issue.

Here are some tips for writing a solid literature review:

  • Cite and summarize studies that used a similar subject of analysis to tackle a research problem.
  • Include a description of any recent work that supports your analysis and the questions you are asking.
  • Explain how it introduces new ideas that can pave the way for future research, or how it provides a new understanding.
  • Synthesize or combine any literature that pertains to unanswered questions and unresolved concerns about the topic. Describe how your subject of analysis will help address these concerns.

The method should support your subject of analysis.

Method – In this section, explain your reasons for selecting the topic and the strategy used in answering research questions. Descriptions of the method can vary according to the type of analysis in which your case study is framed.

The four subjects of analysis and how to describe your method according to each subject are:

  • Incident/event – The incident looks at a rare happening in order to find new ways of thinking about the broader problem or to test a hypothesis. For a case study about a critical incident, describe the method used to highlight the event. Explain how you determined the validity of the case to discover broader perspectives or new findings with respect to the research.
  • Person – Describe why you chose to focus on this individual. What experience does he or she have that provides an opportunity to promote new knowledge? Include the person’s background information; this will help readers understand the importance of his/her experiences to your study. (When mentioning more than one person, clearly differentiate them from others and explain how they are useful to your research.)
  • Place – Describe the essential attributes of the place or arena in which the topic exists (physical, social, economic, cultural, political, etc.). Explain the method used for choosing this place and how it sheds light on new knowledge. Clearly establish why it has been chosen as the topic.
  • Phenomenon – Any fact or circumstance that can be observed or studied but is not clearly understood can be a phenomenon. In social and behavioral sciences, this may focus on human interaction within a complex social, economic, cultural, or physical setting.

Writing the discussion is all about piecing together your findings.

Discussion – The discussion section should focus on interpreting and drawing conclusions about the significant findings you’ve gathered. This section should have the following objectives:

  • State the major findings – Restate why you focused on the research problem or subject of analysis. In a declarative, straightforward, and succinct statement, describe your findings. Emphasize unexpected data and present it clearly.
  • Explain the essence of the findings – Describe the meaning of your findings and why they are significant. Start with the most important or unexpected findings and review each one.
  • Link the findings to similar existing studies – Acknowledge the relationship of your findings to that of prior studies, especially if your subject of analysis was inspired by others. Comparing and contrasting helps to establish the importance of your results and differentiates your analysis from previous research.
  • Identify the limitations of your study – Explain the limitations of your study as well as any unanswered questions that could not be addressed (or why they are not significant).
  • Suggest areas for future research – Lead the way for future research on your topic. There may be additional questions related to the topic that can lend themselves to further investigation.

Talk about the results and how relevant they are.

Conclusion – Using direct, simple language, summarize your conclusion and highlight how your results differ from or strengthen the conclusion of previous studies. Synthesize the key findings and clearly state how they answer the research questions.

Writing a case study requires time and a great deal of research. If you are unsure of how to get started, consider hiring a writing professional.

The experts at Masters Essay can help you craft a well-thought-out and articulate academic case study. We provide academic essay writing assistance in Toronto 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Call us today at (647) 436-7280 or contact our toll-free number at 1-800-573-0840.

31 01 19

A good essay is key to your university admission

A compelling university admissions essay can be the difference between acceptance and rejection. Grades are an important part of your application, but they are not the only key component. Your writing will help set you apart from other applicants with similar scores. Knowing how to write an essay will leave a good impression. Think of it as an opportunity to show admissions officers what qualities you have that would make you a good candidate for their school.

You have a unique background and set of experiences; your university admissions essay is a way to share all that with prospective schools. The trick is to write a thoughtful, personal paper about a topic that matters to you. Many applicants try too hard to sound smart, or write about topics they don’t care about to look impressive. All you have to do is show yourself as thoughtful and motivated, and that will demonstrate that you have something to add to a class.

Use these tips to help craft a strong essay that highlights what you have to offer:

  • Read the instructions – In all the excitement, you might forget to thoroughly heed the instructions. Follow the application directions to the letter. Failing to comply with guidelines could lead admissions officers to assume you wouldn’t follow the program’s directions. Stick to page and word count limits. The idea is to organize your thoughts according to the rules.

Develop an outline before writing

  • Organize your thoughts – Start by brainstorming. Take a piece of paper and jot down ideas. Do some research on different topics and ideas that you might find interesting. Then consider which ideas could combine with one another. For example, you can compare and contrast different ideas. Write a rough outline. Think about how long each paragraph should be to express your ideas clearly. Finally, create a schedule as a guide for how much time to devote to your work.
  • Be controversial – Many applicants submit bland, safe essays that don’t take a stand on anything. Discussing politics or religion can be a valid approach! Remember to stay balanced and thoughtful, regardless of your opinion. Present your views on the subject, but be fair and logical. Give reasons to support your position. “Avoid speechifying.”

Higher education is the place for discussion of ideas. Your essay is a tool to present your ideas to an interested panel. Some people look for diversity of ideas, so consider sharing some of yours.

  • Avoid using cliches – Looking at other essays as research is generally an excellent idea. However, be wary of other writers’ influence. Precise word choices and unique phrases will help your paper stand out from the crowd. Review your work and delete any “old hat” statements. Give admissions something that’s all yours and make them take notice.

Consider before trying to be funny

  • Be careful with humour – Jokes can be an excellent way to get yourself noticed–but use this technique carefully. Your idea of “funny” may differ from that of an admissions’ officer. Avoid one-liners, limericks, and off-colour humour. They may be perceived as unprofessional.
  • Show, don’t tell – Avoid simply stating facts and ideas. Admissions officers are more concerned with your perspective on events than with the events themselves. Include specific details and examples. For example, don’t merely mention extracurricular activities. Describe how they made you feel, and what you learned from participating in them. The officers don’t know you personally. Use your words to paint a picture of who you are and what you can contribute to the college or university.
  • Know your vocabulary – The words you use demonstrate your mastery of writing, and how well you can make an argument. A university-level essay should display a similar level of vocabulary. Make certain you are using words correctly. Synonyms can have different shades of meaning; the wrong one could sully your message.

Find examples of how words are used before using them. Use plain language most of the time. Overusing big words can make your writing seem pretentious. Think of advanced words as a spice, and your ideas as the main dish.

  • Write distinct essays – Every university has a distinct culture. An admission essay is a statement that you are a good fit for that particular school. If you’re applying for more than one place, write a distinct essay for each. Some of your points may not apply to every university. Research and learn about their individual cultures, values, and awards. Tailor your work to make it relevant to each unique mission and values.
  • Be concise – Applying to university is much like applying for a job. You are given only so much space to show why you deserve a spot. Meet their specifications, but be brief. Admissions officers have to read several essays each day. You have a few hundred words to grab their attention. Be precise, organize your thoughts, and show that you’re respectful of others’ time.

Proofread thoroughly before submitting

  • Edit – The job isn’t done when you have finished writing. Proofreading and editing your essay is an essential step, and can play a major role in separating your work from the crowd. Check the word count and make sure it complies with requirements. Read each sentence to ensure that your thoughts are expressed clearly. Check for spelling, punctuation, and grammatical errors. A thorough read-through will help spot errors, and result in a better submission.

Consult a teacher for a second opinion

  • Seek a second opinion – Before submitting the essay, ask for advice from someone qualified. Sometimes others can spot mistakes a writer might miss. If you can, ask someone with expertise in the admissions process. Ask a teacher you trust to give feedback. Ask only a few select people for help; too much feedback can affect the quality of your writing. Remember, the essay should present your thoughts the way you want them heard.

One of the most important things you can do is to start writing early. Give yourself plenty of time to write and finish well ahead of the deadline. Use extra time to fine-tune the essay and make it the best it can be. In case of any setbacks, you have time to edit and rewrite your work.

Writing skills are essential for university

Good writing skills can help in any facet of life, and they are essential for success at university. A good admissions essay is only the first step. Once you are in school, you’ll need those skills to write quality research papers and other projects. Sometimes, a university workload can be difficult to handle. In that case, give Masters Essay a call for help with writing papers and presentations.

Masters Essay specializes in quality academic writing. For quality research, an organized layout, and logical reasoning, get our writing team on your side. Call us at (647) 436-7280.

21 12 18

If you’re still asking yourself what you should do after graduation, know that the job of your dreams may, in fact, be within your reach. A well-written, comprehensive resume is the first step in getting there. (Consider using a professional resume writing service to help craft a winning one!) However, a good cover letter is just as important—perhaps moreso, especially if you don’t have a lot of experience to put on a resume. The cover letter shows off your personality and makes employers curious to know more about you. It allows you to expand on points in your resume that pertain to the position of interest. With specific keywords, your cover letter matches your qualifications and shows that you’re a good candidate.

A cover letter is the first thing a potential employer sees, so you want to make a good impression. It may not be read it if it’s long or rambling, so get to the point quickly and limit yours to one page or less. It should also give a good indication of your communication and writing skills. A clear and organized cover letter that’s free of grammatical errors says a lot about the applicant—even with just a quick glance. The tone of your cover letter should be positive, friendly, and confident.

A cover letter has several specific goals:

  • To introduce yourself and give the employer an idea of who you are
  • To show that you have the skills and qualifications to do the job
  • To provide additional information or expand on items listed on your resume
  • To request a meeting or interview

Address and Letterhead

On the upper right corner of the page, put your name, address, phone number, email address, and a link to your website or LinkedIn profile. (You can also design your own letterhead to give your cover letter a more professional look.) The address of the company you are writing to goes on the left side underneath your personal information. Remember to leave space beneath this information before starting your letter.

Your resume and cover letter are best formatted in size 12 font so they’re easy to read. Also use a font that looks professional, like Calibri or Times New Roman. Leave the Comic Sans or other childish fonts for another time.

get ready for new positions

Salutation

A salutation can be confusing for job applicants. Is ‘To Whom it May Concern’ or ‘Dear Hiring Manager’ correct, or is it better to include the name of someone specific? If the hiring manager’s name isn’t mentioned in the job posting, make the effort to find out what it is. If possible, also use the person’s correct title, i.e. Ms., Dr., or Mr. Look for this information on the organization’s official website, LinkedIn profile, or simply call the company and ask for the person’s name and official title. If you don’t address the employer correctly, your cover letter could seem like a form letter instead. A proper salutation will show that you are someone who takes the initiative (and it could be a positive point in your favour).

you have what it takes to get

Opening paragraph

The goal of the first paragraph is to express your interest in the position, so clearly state the title of the job for which you are applying. (It’s not necessary to explain where you saw the position advertised.) Then write a few sentences about why the position interests you. Make your statements brief and concise; you’ll expand on these points later in the letter.

your cover letter addressess the skills

Middle Paragraph

The middle paragraph is important because this is where you’ll explain your resume in more detail. Show the reader that you match all or most of their requirements. It’s also important to know if you’ll fit in with the company, so learn about the organization and have a good understanding of who they are and what they do. Perhaps research the hiring manager (or whoever will receive your letter) as well.

Employers often match job applications to specific keywords from their ad, so use those words in your cover letter. (Keywords can be anything related to the position or its requirements.) Let your letter reflect the tone of the ad and highlight how your goals match the company’s mission.

If you think you’re well-suited for the job, you may want to add another paragraph here. Once you’ve learned about the company, you can express how you think your specific goals and experience fit in with its mission and future plans. Comment on what you think you could specifically accomplish for them in light of all this information.

a good cover letter can help you

Final Paragraph

The final paragraph of the cover letter should be about two to four sentences long. The purpose of this section is primarily to mention the attached resume and stress that you’re open to meeting for an interview. Phrase the final sentence or two as a call to action, such as “Please give me a call at your convenience at 555-2020 so we can set up a meeting to discuss the position further.” Finally, thank the potential employer for taking your application into consideration.

you got the job

Closing

Include a closing that’s both professional and polite. (“Sincerely” or “Best Regards” are appropriate options.) After your closing, skip a few lines and then write and sign your full name. If your application is being submitted electronically, create a digital signature and add it to your letter. Use a digital writing pad or buy software that will allow you to make a digital signature stamp.

If you’ve been following this series of blogs, you now have a better idea of how to write a good resume and a strong cover letter. Remember to tailor both to the specific job you’re applying for and avoid sending out form letters. Now you’re ready to start the job hunt. Good luck!

At Master’s Essay, our mission is to provide you with academic help that will make your day-to-day life in school go more smoothly. We offer professional resume writing services which can bring your job application up to a more sophisticated level. We also offer assistance with essay writing, dissertations, and research papers.

Call us 24/7 for live support:

  • Toll-Free: (800) 573-0840
  • Toronto & GTA: (647) 436-7280
  • Calgary: (587) 880-4707
  • Vancouver: (604) 245-5865
19 12 18

As graduation day approaches, you may be thinking about what to do after school ends and perhaps setting goals for the next stage of life. Starting a new chapter can be both exciting and challenging, but it’s perfectly normal to ask yourself, “What do I do now?” Some people will be starting out for the first time in a career, and others may be pursuing second or even third careers. Whatever your age, profession, salary level, or experience, your resume is a key factor in gaining employment. It must be prepared using the correct format and set of standards for resumes. Applicants are also expected to use specific keywords related to their profession.

This information is very important, so you might consider going to a resume expert for help. Before anything though, you will need some information to build your resume and cover letter. Here is a helpful guide to creating a chronological resume meeting specific standards. These tips will guide you through the steps in writing a good first draft. To gain further expertise, consider taking a course in resume and cover letter writing.

reusme

Preparing a Resume

A resume is the first step in getting a job interview at your targeted company. It must show who you are in a way that will catch people’s attention and make you stand out. Employers often spend only a few seconds looking at a resume before moving on, so make them really want to keep reading. Focus on how you would fit the position and the company rather than just describing your related experience. A cover letter also plays a big role in that process.

In most of North America, there are specific sections you must include in a resume and they have to be in a specific order:

  • Contact information
  • Career summary
  • Employment experience
  • Education or professional development
  • Volunteer work, community service, or technical skills (optional and where suitable)

Keep the length limited to one to two pages (the majority of professionals have a two-page document). It’s also standard to format both your cover letter and resume into the same document and convert it to a PDF file before submitting. Develop a standard resume and then tailor it based on the position for which you’re applying. The same is true of cover letters.

stand out

Sections of the Resume

    1. Contact Information

Your contact information has to be printed clearly at the top of the resume in the header, and it should contain your full name, address and phone number (in Canada), email address, and a link to your Linkedin profile. What you are not required to include is your date of birth, gender, parents’ names, and marital status. (In Canada, it’s not part of the standard format to include this information, and it’s illegal to ask about some of these aspects in an interview.) Your email address should sound professional; you may even want to set up a separate account for job hunting.

stated career
Career Summary

This section is crucial because it’s the employer’s first look at who you are professionally. Write a paragraph or two summarizing your main skills and why you’re right for the position. It should begin with a stated objective and how it pertains to the potential job position or role. This is the place to summarize your past and current experience and your career goals.

    1. Employment Experience

List each of your past job positions from most to least current. Include the time period you were in the role and your general responsibilities. List (as bullet points) two or three of your main accomplishments within the position. This gives employers a much better idea of your performance and strengths. Notice the difference between “Management skills in the publishing industry” and “Successfully managed a large-scale international publishing project, securing a future two-million-dollar contract with the client.” The second statement tells the company much more about what you could accomplish if hired.

Below each position, highlight any major projects you completed while you were there. Similar to when you list your overall accomplishments, give one or two brief sentences about what the project entailed and what you personally accomplished.

    1. Education or Professional Development

Educational degrees or professional development courses should be listed in order with the most recent first, along with the year of completion and the institution you attended. Provide information about awards or distinctions you received and any theses or dissertations you completed.

perfect job

    1. Additional Information

Some people like to add a section to their resume outlining volunteer work or community involvement. If it pertains to the position you want, feel free to do this. However, if it’s irrelevant, be careful not to overdo it. Briefly list no more than three or four experiences. If the job you’re applying for is a technical position, you could add a section called “Technical Skills.”

keywords

Keywords

One fairly new development in the world of employment and job searching is the requirement to use keywords specific to your profession in your cover letter and resume. Keywords are search words or terms that employers type into employment websites to look for potential applicants. When your resume includes these keywords, there’s a greater chance that potential employers will see it and contact you. In an interview, those keywords will show them that you have all of the specified job qualifications.

Keywords should be spread throughout every section of your resume. If you want to determine what the keywords should be, think about key skills and terms in your profession and look at the specific job advertisement. Pick keywords out of the ad and use them in the resume and cover letter. Those are the words the employer will want to see.

Keywords include: school names, names of employers, profession-specific awards, soft skills, foreign languages, job-specific skills and knowledge, job titles, affiliations and union memberships, industry credentials, licenses, degrees, tools, equipment, and technical applications.

Hopefully, this guide has helped you put together a solid draft of your resume. If you’re new to a field, consider writing a functional resume that highlights skills rather than experience in a specific area. The next step is to write the perfect cover letter so you can start looking and applying for job opportunities—and get hired!

At Masters Essay, we are here to help you with all of your academic needs. In addition to resume writing services, we also provide assistance in academic areas like essay writing and editing and proofreading.

Call us 24/7 for live support:

  • Toll-Free: (800) 573-0840
  • Toronto & GTA: (647) 436-7280
  • Calgary: (587) 880-4707
  • Vancouver: (604) 245-5865
2 10 18

As every doctoral student knows, writing and completing a dissertation is a major challenge. It is common to struggle throughout the process and question whether you are making enough progress. The undertaking can be much easier if a few principles are followed, no matter which stage of the dissertation process you’re in. This will ensure that you will reach your goal of successfully defending your dissertation and getting that hard-earned PhD.

Here are some tips to help you write a dissertation:

Eliminate any hint of self-doubt

Everyone struggles with self-doubt at some point in their lives. As a doctoral student, when you are struggling to complete your dissertation you may start to think you are bad at research, writing, gathering data, presentations, statistical analysis, or public speaking. You may also start comparing yourself to other doctoral students, especially if they are further along in the process. The key to changing your mindset is to remind yourself that you are at the post-graduate level and have already achieved so much. Take things one day at a time, focus on your abilities, and tell yourself you have what it takes to acquire that PhD.

Set deadlines for yourself

Set goals and deadlines

As a doctoral student, you are already familiar with working toward deadlines for your professors. Setting deadlines for yourself at the outset of the dissertation writing process will keep you focused and motivated. The process is long and involved, but having tangible goals to strive toward will help break down the project into manageable sections and give you a sense of completion along the way. Having set deadlines will also allow you to identify any problem areas and give you ample time to have these resolved.

Your goals and deadlines must be flexible

Setting deadlines and goals is key to completing your dissertation. However, things don’t always go as planned; life may throw some unexpected obstacles at you. When this happens, you will be required to make adjustments to your schedule and deadlines. Be prepared and open to changes in the progress you are making in your dissertation and adjust your timelines as needed.

Ask for feedback or help to keep on track

Request feedback often

An important part of the dissertation writing process involves obtaining feedback. Getting feedback about your writing will save you valuable time as it will ensure you are on the right track and that you are doing the proper research. It will also alleviate feelings of isolation and keep you motivated.

At the beginning, approach faculty members to determine how much feedback they are able and willing to provide. As they are often busy with a wide variety of tasks, a clear understanding of how they will manage the feedback process is essential. Some may be willing to read several drafts of each chapter, others may only want to read the entire dissertation at the end. There are no rules with how faculty provide feedback so ensure that you negotiate what you need at the outset.

Understand what your committee expects from you

The most relevant audience for your dissertation is your committee. Requesting feedback from committee members will give you an idea of the type of writing they want and are expecting from you. Keeping the lines of communication open will help you throughout the process.

Request to review dissertations written by students who have worked with the same committee. Ask the students the types of things that were expected for their chapters, how footnotes and endnotes should be utilized, the types of sources that need to be used, how to structure chapters, and other relevant details. This will give you a clearer understanding of what is expected of you.

Take breaks as needed

Rest whenever you need

Give yourself short breaks or take time off from writing when you need it. Spend time with family, watch a movie, or have coffee with friends without feeling guilty. Getting enough rest is important if you want to succeed in completing your dissertation. Taking a break can also refresh your mind and provide new objectivity, especially if you are experiencing writer’s block. Once the break is over, get back to writing again. Extending the break may lead to writing that is rushed; this will affect the quality of the dissertation. It may be challenging to balance your academic responsibilities with other obligations, but finding that balance is key. Make time to write but take breaks when you need them.

Saying “No” Saves Time

One of the obstacles you face while writing your dissertation is a lack of free time. Friends and family often don’t understand what is involved in the process and may unintentionally try to distract you from your work. Keeping to your schedule and staying focused on your writing often means saying no to invitations. Decline gracefully and remind people that the demand on your time is temporary until you complete your dissertation.

Divide your writing into small batches

You’ve most likely heard that dissertation writing is a marathon, not a sprint. The writing happens in small pieces over a long period of time. No matter how busy you are during the day, always set a specific amount of time to write. This will provide a daily routine and will ensure that you stay focused and on track. Writing a specific amount per day will also make it easier for you to complete the journey in a timely fashion.

Stay focused

Do not make excuses

Writing a dissertation is difficult. There are many excuses not to write, including:

  • “I don’t have time.”
  • “I have a migraine.”
  • I have more important work to do.
  • “I have people to see, TV shows to watch, and meetings to attend.”

There will always be reasons not to write; that is the challenge. Force yourself to disregard these excuses and focus on the task at hand. Stick to your schedule as this is the only way to get anything done.

Celebrate small accomplishments

Rewarding yourself for small accomplishments while writing your dissertation will make you happier and allow you to better enjoy the process. Did you just finish a page? Did you overcome a difficult section? Treat yourself to something you enjoy. Go for a walk, have a special snack, or chat with a friend. Make yourself feel good about the progress you’ve made so far.

Keep your eyes on the prize!

Writing a dissertation is a long and involved process. All that had work will eventually pay off. If you need help along the way, Masters Essay can assist with every aspect including research, proofreading, and editing. Contact us today at 1-800-573-0840.

23 08 18

Writing a great cover letter isn’t easy for everyone. Creating strong sentence structure and highlighting your background and skills are key points. Depending upon the strength of your letter, you may get a call for an interview or be outdone by another applicant.

The goal is to expand upon your resume in a way that reflects your personality. Your resume/CV highlights your education, skills, and experience. The cover letter supports your resume with examples of your relevant working experience and success stories.

Here are several pointers on writing a killer cover letter:

Personalize – Add your own style and use examples that suit the job for which you’re applying. You can start with a generic cover letter and personalize it based on the job. This effort takes more than swapping company names and adding random thoughts. You can only stand out if your wording reflects you have the experience to fulfill the job description supplied by the employer.

Be honest

Be honest – When promoting yourself don’t stray from the truth. Be sure you can live up to your promises and back up any claims of experience. If you’re found to have been dishonest in your application, you may be out of a job pretty quickly.

Don’t make it all about you – In addition to sharing your academic degrees and skill sets that are relevant to the job, outline your unique abilities that can benefit the company. Do some research about the company and who’s doing the hiring. Instead of writing “to whom it may concern,” use LinkedIn to identify the personnel who’ll review your application.

Keep it to one page

Keep it to one page – Avoid being redundant. Write with a professional tone, with one page of text that has three to four paragraphs. If you find cover letters challenging to write, explore ideas and tips provided on the Internet.

Avoid spamming – Follow up must be done respectfully and not too often. If the company doesn’t specify that they don’t want to hear from applicants, send one follow-up email after the submission deadline. If you don’t get a response, continue your job search.

Proofread

Proofread – Avoid sloppy typos; your potential employer will remember such errors, and likely discard your application. Consider hiring a proofreading service to check your work before it is submitted.

Writing an effective cover letter is not a simple task. It requires time and plenty of effort. Always aim to stay relevant to the position for which you’re applying. For help with cover letters, contact Masters Essay at (647) 436-7280. We’ll strengthen your writing and help you put your best foot forward.

15 08 18

Most of us face challenges in writing essays, particularly during the first draft. Essay writing is a crucial part of both high school and university curriculums, and is often the difference between a pass and a fail. Here are some effective techniques for writing consistently outstanding essays.

Get Organized

Before writing your essay, gather your resources and take into account the following:

  1. Plan on how you will source the information for your essay. Do you feel more comfortable at a library, or working from home?
  2. The Internet is an excellent resource, but social media and other platforms can be distracting. Limit your Internet usage to enhance your concentration and assure better quality of work.
  3. Gather the necessary materials before you begin writing. Think about how much time it will take to complete your essay. Remember to leave at least three days before the deadline to make any last-minute changes.

Gather Information

Gather Information

Your professor may offer preliminary information, but it’s valuable to seek additional information on your own to add depth to your essay. Take notes and make sure that each source is relevant and reliable.

Common sources include:

  • Online blogs
  • Newspaper articles
  • History books
  • Academic articles

Planning

Planning

Planning is a crucial first step in improving your writing. This step is often overlooked, and can be rushed or neglected. If you’ve ever been critiqued for poor line structure or vague arguments, you need to bring better focus to your planning. Here are some tips for creating a succinct essay plan:

  1. Read your notes multiple times and highlight important or relevant points. On a sheet of paper, section your ideas in separate columns, connecting them together to form a diagram.
  2. Look at your diagram and notes, and determine your primary argument. Having a clear vision for your main argument will help you maintain focus.
  3. Re-read the notes and diagram from conclusion to introduction. What aspects of your essay validate your argument? What needs to be expanded?
  4. Include additional information and ideas from your notes. Strong analysis, bullet points, and introductions will support your argument.
  5. Contact a friend who doesn’t know about your topic. If your essay makes sense to them, it’s a good sign that you’re on the right track.

Write

The writing itself can be stressful for several reasons:

Writing on a blank page – Staring at a blank page can be daunting. The key to beginning the writing process is to write anything that comes to mind.

Writer’s block – If you encounter writer’s block, reread your plan and your argument. If you still can’t link your thoughts, try writing as simplistically as possible (e.g. in bullet points). Take breaks whenever you are feeling overwhelmed.

Writing leads to nowhere – If you feel as though you have lost the overall vision of your essay, go back to your diagram. A renewal of perspective can help you discover how your writing needs to change.

Style
Everyone has their own writing style, but in essay writing, it’s important to be precise. Complicating your essay with vague phrasing may result in confusion for the reader. Keep your vocabulary clear and concise. Make sure that the words you use are understandable and are presented in the correct context.

If you are unsure of your completed essay, hire a proofreader to verify the overall structure of your work. Masters Essay in Toronto, Ontario, can help you achieve academic excellence in writing through their professional proofreading services. Call us today at (647) 436-7280, or contact our toll-free number at 1-800-573-0840.

11 07 18

Teachers commonly require academic papers to assess a student’s comprehension of a topic. Academic assessments often come in the form of research papers, which are defined as a person’s thoughts or perception of a topic based on thorough analysis. When writing an academic paper, be mindful of the following things.

Common Types of Academic Papers

Definition Papers

Definition papers describe an idea from a factual perspective. These papers do not contain opinion or emotion. Although you may gather facts from different sources, the information is simply stated and supported. However, a definition paper can provide a good framework for persuasive, argumentative, or analytical papers.

Argumentative Papers

Argumentative Papers

Argumentative papers present two sides of a scenario in one paper. Most good argumentative papers include in-text citations from different researchers and logical facts in support of both sides of the argument. Ultimately, these facts should conclude and culminate your analysis with the pros and cons of each side. The challenge in writing an argumentative paper is that while you are advocating for one side over the other, the way in which you present both arguments must remain neutral and factual.

Persuasive Papers

Persuasive papers choose a stance and provide logical arguments to defend that stance. Unlike argumentative papers, persuasive papers do not need to present ideas that support any opposing stance. It can also include more emotional and perspective-based opinions.

Purpose of Academic Paper Formats

When writing academic papers, the way you present your paper is crucial. Using the proper citing, referencing, and quoting of your sources allow for you to communicate your ideas in a manner that is shared by others in your field.

Some of these formats include:

Chicago Manual of Style

Chicago Manual of Style

The Chicago Manual of Style (CMS) is predominantly used in humanities, particularly literature, history, or the arts.

Modern Language Association Style
The Modern Language Association Style (MLA) is also popular with students of humanities. Artists, linguists, and theatre students have been using MLA for over 500 years.

American Psychological Association Style

American Psychological Association Style

The American Psychological Association Style (APA) is a set of rules and guidelines established by the American Psychological Association. This format is popular among students and practitioners of psychology, sociology, social work, and medicine.

When working on your research paper, remember to pay extra attention to the way you format your source materials. Use the handouts that your teachers give you, or any online reference materials to ensure that all formatting is accurate.

For expert advice in formatting your research paper, Masters Essay is here to help. Call us at (647) 436-7280 for our Toronto and GTA location, (587)-880-4707 for our Calgary location, and (604) 245-5865 for our Vancouver location. You can also reach us toll-free at 1-800-573-0840.

25 06 18

Essays help gauge a writer’s understanding of a topic, and many teachers require students to submit them as part of their academic curriculum. Essays can improve both written and communication skills, improving a person’s spelling and grammar.
In an academic setting, informative essays are usually the most likely to be assigned. However, they are often confused with descriptive essays; both communicate with their audience.

Read on to understand the difference between an informative essay and a descriptive essay:

Informative Essay

This is a piece of writing that educates the reader about a specific topic. An informative essay takes a neutral stand, much like a journalism piece. It doesn’t present arguments or try to persuade the reader to change their opinions or beliefs. It presents facts.

Descriptive Essay

A descriptive essay gives the readers a vivid depiction of a person, event, object, or place. A good descriptive essay is not necessarily based on statistics and facts, but on an artistic representation of a specific topic. The goal is to give the reader a well-rounded impression of what you are trying to convey.

How to Tell the Difference

While it may seem difficult to differentiate between an informative essay and a descriptive one, they each have distinctive features:

  • An informative essay is focused on research-based facts and statistics, while a descriptive essay allows the writer more artistic freedom of expression.
  • An informative essay is strictly objective, while a descriptive essay may depend on the perception of the writer.

For example, if you’re writing about about the history of Niagara Falls, it would be considered an informative essay. On the other hand, writing about the beauty of the Falls would be considered a descriptive piece.

Essay-writing Tips

Choose your topic

When considering your essay topic, choose a subject you find interesting. A topic that is either too broad or difficult to cover may not be a good choice. Instead, narrow your subject to address a specific question or issue. This also keeps readers engaged and helps them understand what you’re trying to convey.

Stay faithful to the essay type

Knowing the difference between an informative and descriptive essay will help you comply with the assignment, ensuring that you have a greater understanding of the essay’s ultimate goal.

When writing an informative essay, stick to well-researched facts. Review whether the sources you cite are reliable.

When writing a descriptive essay, be creative with the words you use. Be mindful that everything is written correctly: review grammar, spelling, and word usage. Incorporate the five senses (sight, sound, smell, taste, and touch) when writing your descriptive piece.

Edit your work more than once

Your first draft will not be perfect, and that’s okay. Reread your piece and determine how it can be improved. You may wish to ask a trusted friend, fellow student, or loved one to go over what you’ve written to help determine areas that need strengthening.

Some students find essay writing difficult, but when you’ve done your research and have chosen a topic that interests you, it can be enjoyable and informative.

Masters Essay offers assistance with essay writing at any level. Call us today at (647) 436-7280.

25 06 18

Writing a short story is a great way to practice writing skills. Because a short story limits your word count, you have to determine which details are important and delete the others. This can be a challenge for writers who have so many ideas they want to convey. If you have been tasked with writing a short story but are stuck, here’s some information to help:

What is a Short Story?

Short stories are fictional works. There are three kinds of short stories:

  • Micro fiction – can be as short as five to less than 100 words
  • Flash fiction – length ranges from 101 to 1,000 words
  • Traditional – can be as long as 5,000 words per story

Elements of a Short Story

Writers who excel at writing short stories are able to master combining five elements that must be present. These are:

  • Characters – these are people, animals, objects, or creatures that think and talk
  • Setting – the location where the story takes place
  • Plot – the series of events that lead to the climax
  • Theme – a general “truth” about life
  • Point of View – the vantage point the author uses to tell a story

Steps to Writing a Short Story

A short story is an artform that takes practice and dedication. Here is a five-step plan to help you improve your short story writing:

  1. Determine what message you’re trying to convey
    Choosing a theme for the story makes it easier to formulate a story. When you know which lessons the characters should learn or teach the readers, it helps inspire writing.
  2. Write a plot that coincides with the message
    Once you’ve figured your message, create a storyline that coincides with that theme. The first step is what message you want to tell. This second step is how you deliver that message.
  3. Create your character
    Memorable fiction characters are detailed. Give each a distinct personality and allow them to develop. Character development is one of the biggest challenges for short story writers. You only have a handful of pages to transform certain characters.
  4. Write an attention-grabbing first paragraph
    The first paragraph of your story captures the attention of an audience. Make that paragraph interesting by making a bold statement, relate to the audience, appeal to the senses, or add a little mystery.
  5. Build to the climax and end with a satisfying resolution
    Short stories begin closer to the climax than a regular novel would. Keep your build to the climax interesting and fast, and take care not to rush it.

Here’s how to build a gripping end to the story:

  • Write a clear-cut ending that explains exactly what happens
  • Provide an open ending that lets the readers decide for themselves how the story ends
  • Offer a monologue from one of the characters, tying it all together
  • Create symbolic ending with meaning beyond the literal one

One of the best ways to improve your creative writing skills is to keep reading. Observe the writing techniques of authors you enjoy, and try to develop your own creative writing style.

If you need help with writing, editing, proofreading, or finishing a writing assignment, Masters Essay is at your service. Call us today at (647) 436-7280.